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Rules..Rules..and More Rules……

Categories: Community News, Headlines, Rules, Spotlight | Posted: March 31, 2014 | No Comments »

4 - USGA

Yes, the Rules of Golf can be fun.  The Referee likes to spend evenings perusing through the Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts.

Here’s the latest I like to refer to as:

Things just keep getting better …

Decision 13-2/0.5

Meaning of “Improve” in Rule 13-2

Q.Rule 13-2 prohibits a player from improving certain areas. What does “improve” mean?

Answer:

In the context of Rule 13-2, “improve” means to change for the better so that the player gains a potential advantage with respect to the position or lie of his ball, the area of his intended stance or swing, his line of play or a reasonable extension of that line beyond the hole, or the area in which he is to drop or place a ball. Therefore, merely changing an area protected by Rule 13-2 will not be a breach of Rule 13-2 unless it creates such a potential advantage for the player in his play.

Examples of changes that are unlikely to create such a potential advantage are if a player:

· repairs a small pitch-mark on his line of play five yards in front of his ball prior to making a 150-yard approach shot from through the green;

· accidentally knocks down several leaves from a tree in his area of intended swing with a practice swing, but there are still so many leaves or branches remaining that the area of intended swing has not been materially affected; or

· whose ball lies in thick rough 180 yards from the green, walks forward and pulls strands of grass on his line of play and tosses them in the air to determine the direction of the wind.

Examples of changes that are likely to create such a potential advantage are if a player:

· repairs a pitch-mark through the green five yards in front of his ball and on his line of play prior to making a stroke from off the putting green that might be affected by the pitch-mark (e.g., a putt or a low-running shot);

· accidentally knocks down a single leaf from a tree in his area of intended swing with a practice swing, but, as this was one of very few leaves that might either interfere with his swing or fall and thereby distract him, the area of intended swing has been materially affected; or

· pulls strands of grass from rough a few inches behind his ball to test the wind, but thereby reduces a potential distraction for the player, or resistance to his club, in the area of his intended swing.

The determination as to whether a player has gained a potential advantage from his actions is made by reference to the situation immediately prior to his stroke. If there is a reasonable possibility that the player’s action has created a potential advantage, the player is in breach of Rule 13-2.

Rules Rules Rules…I Just Saw It…

Categories: Rules, Spotlight | Posted: March 11, 2014 | No Comments »

rulebookYes, the Rules of Golf can be fun.  The Referee likes to spend evenings perusing through the Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts.

Here’s the latest I like to refer to as:

I only did it once, I swear…

 

Decision 13-4/9

Player Creates and Smoothes Footprints in Bunker Prior to Making Stroke

Q. A player’s ball lies in a bunker and a rake has been left in another part of the bunker. Prior to making his stroke in the bunker, the player retrieves the rake. Having lifted the rake, the player smoothes the footprints that he has just created, and some others in the process. What is the ruling?

Answer.

There is no penalty provided the smoothing was done for the sole purpose of caring for the course and nothing was done to breach Rule 13-2 in relation to the player’s next stroke (see Exception 2 to Rule 13-4).

If, however, a player is regularly creating and smoothing footprints close to his ball prior to making strokes from bunkers, it would be appropriate to question the player about the purpose of the smoothing. In such circumstances, the smoothing might be for the purpose of gaining knowledge of the condition of the bunker rather than being for the sole purpose of caring for the course. If so, the player would be in breach of Rule 13-4a for testing the condition of the hazard.

Rules of Golf Corner…I Just Saw It…..

Categories: Rules, Spotlight, Uncategorized | Posted: February 24, 2014 | No Comments »

Yes, the Rules of Golf can be fun.  The Referee likes to spend evenings perusing through the Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts.

Here’s the latest I like to refer to as:

Now you see it; now you don’t…

12-1/3

Top of Ball in Hazard Covered by Leaves But Part of Ball Visible from Another Angle

Q. The top of the player’s ball in a hazard is covered by leaves so that it is not visible when he takes his stance However, a portion of the ball is visible from another angle. Is it permissible for the player to remove enough leaves to see the ball once he has taken his stance?

A. No. In these circumstances, a player is entitled to remove loose impediments covering a ball in a hazard only if the ball is not visible from any angle.

Rules of Golf Corner…I Just saw it….

Categories: Rules, Spotlight | Posted: February 14, 2014 | No Comments »

Yes, the Rules of Golf can be fun.  The Referee likes to spend evenings perusing through the Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts.

Here’s the latest I like to refer to as:

 

I Just saw it…

Decision 27/3

Time Permitted for Search When Lost Ball Found and Then Lost Again

Q. A player finds his ball in high rough after a two-minute search, leaves the area to get a club and, when he returns, is unable to nd the ball. Is he allowed three minutes or five minutes to nd his ball?

A. Three minutes.

 

Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

Categories: Rules, Spotlight | Posted: October 14, 2013 | No Comments »

Yes, the Rules of Golf can be fun.  The Referee likes to spend evenings perusing through the Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts.

Here’s the latest I like to refer to as:

Not even close…

Decision 18-2b/4

Ball Moves After Player Grounds Club Short Distance Behind Ball But Before Grounding Club Immediately Behind Ball

Q. A player’s routine prior to making a stroke is as follows: he first grounds the club a short distance behind, but not immediately behind the ball. Then, he places the clubhead immediately behind the ball and makes the stroke.

If the ball moves after he grounds the club a short distance behind, but before he grounds it immediately behind, the ball, does he incur a penalty stroke under Rule 18-2b (Ball Moving After Address)?

A. No. A player has not addressed the ball until he has placed the clubhead immediately in front of or behind the ball — see Definition of “Addressing the Ball.”

However, it is a question of fact to be resolved by reference to all available evidence whether the player in fact caused the ball at rest to move. If the player did so, he incurs a one stroke penalty under Rule 18-2a and must replace his ball. Otherwise, the ball must be played from its new location without penalty unless another Rule applies. (Revised)

Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

Categories: Rules, Spotlight, Uncategorized | Posted: September 30, 2013 | No Comments »

Yes the Rules of Golf can be fun. The Referee likes to spend  evenings perusing through Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts. Here is the latest I like to refer to as:  It’s MY turn…

Decision 10-2b/1

Competitor Objects to Fellow-Competitor Putting Out of Turn

 

Q. In stroke play, A’s ball is 40 feet from the hole and B’s is 30 feet away. A putts and his ball comes to rest four feet from the hole. A prepares to hole out before B putts. B objects and claims that under the Rules (Rule 10-2b) he is entitled to putt before A.

Although putting out of turn in stroke play is generally condoned, should the Committee allow A to putt out of turn in these circumstances?

A. If A had lifted his ball when the objection was lodged, the Committee should rule that A is not entitled to putt out of turn, in view of Rule 10-2b.

If A had not lifted his ball at the time the objection was lodged, the answer depends on whether B would require A to lift his ball under Rule 22 (Ball Assisting or Interfering with Play) before he (B) putts. If so, the Committee should rule that A is entitled to play out of turn, provided he does so without first lifting his ball, i.e., Rule 22-2 permits a competitor in stroke play who is required to lift his ball because of interference to “play first rather than lift.”

If B would not require A to lift his ball before he (B) putts, the Committee should rule that A is not entitled to putt out of turn.

Although condoning putting out of turn in stroke play may be questionable in view of the explicit language of Rule 10-2b, there is no penalty for doing so (Rule 10-2c), it is not in conflict with the intent of Rule 10-2b, and it may tend to speed play. Accordingly, it is considered that the practice should not be discouraged.

Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

Categories: Rules, Spotlight, Uncategorized | Posted: August 30, 2013 | No Comments »

Yes the Rules of Golf can be fun. The Referee likes to spend evenings perusing through Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts. Here is the latest I like to refer to as: You’re bugging me…

 

 

 

23-1/5 & 23-1/5.5

23-1/5

Removal of Insect on Ball

Q. A live insect is stationary or crawling on a player’s ball which is lying through the green. May the player remove the insect with his fingers or blow the insect off the ball?

A. Yes, in both cases, under Rule 23-1. A live insect is not considered to be adhering to the ball and therefore is a loose impediment — see Definition of “Loose Impediments.”

23-1/5.5

Status of Insect on Ball in Bunker

Q. With regard to Decision 23-1/5, what is the ruling if the ball was in a bunker?

A. The insect is considered to be in the bunker and because it is, by definition, a loose impediment, the player may not touch or physically remove the insect from the ball (Rule 13-4c). However, as the insect is animate and capable of moving on its own, the player may take action, such as waving his hand or a club or towel, to encourage the insect to move. If the insect moves, there is no penalty provided the player has not touched the insect or the ground in the bunker, or moved another loose impediment in the bunker.

Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

Categories: Rules, Spotlight | Posted: August 13, 2013 | No Comments »

Yes, the Rules of Golf can be fun. The Referee likes to spend evenings perusing through the Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts.

Here’s the latest I like to refer to as: Talk About Your Bad Luck…

28/3

Ball Dropped Under Unplayable Ball Rule Comes to Rest in Original Position or Another Position at Which Ball Is Unplayable

 Q. A player deemed his ball unplayable and, under Rule 28c, dropped his ball within two club-lengths of the spot where it lay. The ball came to rest in the original position or another position at which the ball was unplayable. What is the ruling?

 A. The ball was in play when it was dropped — Rule 20-4. Thus, if the ball came to rest in the original position, the player must again invoke the unplayable ball Rule, incurring an additional penalty stroke, unless he decides to play the ball as it lies. The same applies if the ball came to rest in another position at which it was unplayable, assuming that the ball did not roll into a position covered by Rule 20-2c, in which case re-dropping without penalty would be required.

Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

Categories: Rules, Spotlight | Posted: July 31, 2013 | No Comments »

Yes, the Rules of Golf can be fun. The Referee likes to spend evenings perusing through the Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts.

Here’s the latest I like to refer to as: I have to go where?…

25-1b/10

Casual Water on Putting Green; Nearest Point of Relief is Off Green

Q. A player whose ball is on a putting green is entitled to relief from casual water. However, the nearest position affording complete relief which is not nearer the hole or in a hazard is off the green in the rough. If the player opts to take relief, must he place the ball in the rough? What is the ruling?
A. Yes. See Rule 25-1b(iii). On the Putting Green: If the ball lies on the putting green, the player must lift the ball and place it, without penalty, as the nearest point of relief that is not in a hazard or, if complete relief is impossible, at the nearest point to where it lay that affords maximum available relief from the condition, but not nearer the hole and not in a hazard. The nearest point of relief or maximum available relief may be off the putting green.

 

Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

Categories: Rules | Posted: July 11, 2013 | No Comments »

Yes, the Rules of Golf can be fun. The Referee likes to spend evenings perusing through the Decisions on the Rules of Golf for the strange, interesting and sometimes funny facts.

Here’s the latest I like to refer to as: Stop the Clock…

27/5.5

Original Ball Found Within Five-Minute Search Period Not Identified Until After Period Has Elapsed

Q. A player plays a second shot, searches for his ball for just over four minutes and then starts to walk back down the fairway to play another ball under Rule 27-1. A ball is then found within the five-minute search period, but as the player is now a considerable distance away, he is unable to identify the ball as his before the search period has elapsed. What is the ruling?
A. As a ball was found within five minutes of beginning search, the player is allowed enough time to reach the area in order to identify it. If the player identifies the ball as his, it is not a “lost ball” even though the identification takes place after the five-minute search period has elapsed.